Abstract waterscapes.

The ‘waterscape’ sees to be a staple in the arsenal of pretty much anyone who owns a camera phone, or professes to be a landscape photographer. I very much enjoy taking this type of image, as if it is done well, there is a ready and consistent market from which to make some reasonable income. I am also keen to explore the possibilities of producing a more abstract and artistic statement from this kind of work, admittedly with a much reduced commercial impact, but far more aesthetically pleasing to myself as an Artist, and hopefully to others who appreciate a variation on a theme.

Often simplistic in composition, with minimal ‘clutter’ within the image, I enjoy exploring the textures within the skies and water and have become fascinated by using a tripod and slow shutter speed to allow the image to take on an almost ethereal feel, with blurred clouds and vague, almost misty water.

994937_10151945236496575_1992800692_n

1970483_10152745891896575_3894544326279280048_n

14525005_10154557599371575_4263731685762070789_o

19577352_10155530830231575_3676404232700627694_o

blue-sweep

dscf2258-edit-edit

waterfallone

 

Method:

Many of the waterscapes I produce are taken around and after sunset, allowing me to use longer exposures to create movement and flow in my work (the concept of ‘flow’ is one that I have visited several times in various projects and I am a great believer in the dramatic effects that movement can add to an image when trying to convey a feeling of drama and life), often combining a tripod mounted camera set to a small aperture, slow shutter speeds, various strength neutral density filters (which reduce the amount of light entering the lens, allowing very long shutter actuations, even in broad daylight), and a cable release, to keep the camera as steady as possible and only introduce the blurring and movement that I want in an image.

I have always worked on individual projects, in order to keep myself busy, but studying at University has brought some semblance of structure and thought to my work, and given me a mental checklist to measure myself against, which has now become second nature and is always at the back of my mind when working:

Research and design development.
Conceptualisation of ideas.
Critical analysis and communication of design solutions. Appropriate use of media and techniques.
Managing workloads and meeting deadlines. Presentation and critical evaluation of finished work.

Conclusions:

As stated earlier, I am more than aware that this type of work has a much less broad appeal to the general viewing audience, but it nurtures my creative urges, allowing me to develop my own style and hopefully appeal to others who are interested in a different slant on an often recorded theme.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s